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Exercises to Avoid in MMA Fitness?

In mixed martial arts (MMA) there are different schools of thought regarding whether there are exercises one should avoid for MMA fitness or not. But sifting through the various opinions, we have found commonalities on things to avoid in MMA fitness training, depending on the situation. We have placed them under four categories: 1) Definitely, you should avoid certain exercises for MMA fitness. (This blatantly disagrees with the other three schools of thought but is included for your consideration). 2) You should avoid bad exercise habits for MMA fitness. 3) What you should avoid depends on your training goals for MMA fitness. 4) You should avoid misusing exercises rather than avoiding specific exercises for MMA fitness.
Below are the four schools of thought, plus commentary.
1. Avoid Certain Exercises, definitely, for MMA fitness. For example, some see no need for lifts that are specifically for toning. Also, leg extensions and leg curls on machines are perceived to be useless and may even cause harm. The reason for this is it is possible a mixed martial artist may have a minor knee issue from grappling, so it would be wise to avoid placing any stress on your knee ligaments such as that which occurs on the leg extension machine.
2. You should avoid bad exercise habits for MMA fitness. Some of these habits, as mentioned earlier, are doing a poor warm up. A good warm up will focus on dynamically, not statically, stretching and warming up and getting the blood flowing, and getting the joints ready for lifting and conditioning sessions. For example high knee runs, high leg kicks, skips, and internal and external shoulder mobility drills ensure support of your joints and muscles and your workout will be more productive. Another bad habit is not following through. For example if you don’t follow through the very end of a lift, it can lead to serious injury. Also, after doing kettlebell swings you should not relax too soon because if you do it can affect your back in the long term. So how you cool down after a workout should also be followed through.
3. What you should avoid for MMA fitness depends on your training goals. For example, if your goal is to increase your bench, squat and deadlift, then curls would be useless and should be avoided for the time being. However, if you are planning to fight in an MMA match, then curls have to be considered. So what to avoid would depend on what your training goal is at each specific point in time. All exercises are effective at some point in time, but the idea is to meet your focused goals at each stage of your training.
4. You should avoid misusing exercises rather than avoiding specific exercises for MMA fitness. Some exercises are good for injury prevention, such as the warm up, which also helps to avoid fatigue build up. If you do a poor warm up, there will be consequences. Also some exercises have higher inherent risks, such as lifting exercises. However, if you are an experienced lifter you will be making your choice based on the risks vs rewards. Also, some exercises will inherently be dangerous for some, yet perfectly safe for others, depending on the overall physical conditioning of the person. For example, if you are over-trained or injured, you should avoid deadlifts for the time being. Other times when you may need to rethink your workout regimen are if you plan on increasing your deadlift, as it may mean adjusting your curls. Another situation would be if you had a partial pectoral tear and are undergoing rehab. You would need to rethink the deadlift and squats.
The above are different schools of thought, but they all have one commonality-safety is primary and it is important to train smart for true MMA fitness.…

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Home Martial Arts Dojo & Fitness Training Area – Ninja Style – Part Two – Adding a Rope to Your Gym

Though it may not seem like a martial arts tactic, a climbing rope is (in my opinion) essential for any fitness gym. Climbing up a rope will develop your arms, back and abdominals. They are easy to set up, fun to climb and you can get very creative with them.
I had mine high in the tree wrapped around a strong branch. I originally used it with a grappling hook to practice throwing up in the tree and catching onto a large branch. I eventually left it there after one of my climbs. I remember when Eye on LA (an TV show) was shooting the video and I was about to climb the rope. I asked them how they would like me to climb it – with or without feet. They were perplexed, so I climbed it without feet and remember the bottom of the rope bouncing around near the camera. Lucky for me I was on the wrestling team where access to ropes was a daily part of our routine.
Yes, there is a pretty big difference when it comes to climbing a rope with or without your feet. The later being far more challenging. Both require some instruction and practice. Climbing the rope itself will develop the grip and strength needed to climb higher. However, you might want to use some grip training tools that you can practice with at the office or in front of the TV.
The bottom of the rope was about head height which was great as I could use it for other training too. For example I would hang any manner of fruit (lemons, oranges etc) and then cut them to pieces with my swords and even kama.
A rope is not only for vertical climbs. It is also a lot of fun if you tie them from tree to tree horizontally. Almost every camp we have organized that included an obstacle course has included both the horizontal and vertical climbing rope. If you have a lot of rope, you can get very creative and come up with something challenging and fun to play on.
The rope I used as a teenager was the brown hemp rope. Mine wasn’t very thick (about 1-2 inches) so I tied knots in it to make it easier to grip and if you are barefoot you can step on the knots. Note that when you put a knot in a rope you are making it weaker, so be sure to use a very strong rope. Now I only use very thick rope (like something you would find on a ship) that is about 3-5 inches thick. These offer an amazing grip.
Static climbing or rappelling rope can be used too, but often they are too skinny to grip, so knots are usually a must. Best if you can double (fold) this type of rope so there is more security and more to grip.
A general rule for a good climbing rope is to have whatever you are grabbing to be about at least (thicker is easier to climb) the same width as a pull up bar, but never larger than what the hand can grasp.
I recently set up another large rope (about 3 inches thick) at our camp in Thailand (it was previously used to anchor a large boat). Climbing this monster, I was reminded of how great of a workout you can get – especially on the upper abs.
Be sure to find a rope that inspires you to climb and swing like Tarzan. All the playing you do on a rope will pay off with biceps, back muscles, improved ab strength and an amazing grip to list a few.
DO NOT use nylon ropes or anything similar unless you want to burn the skin on your hands and feet if you tie them horizontally.
If you have a small target to kick or punch, I suggest that you hang these on the end of your rope, but leave the rope hanging about head height so you have to jump up to it and so you can swing on it. If you do hang a punching bag or something to strike to the bottom, be sure that it isn’t a lot of weight and that you have your rope securely connected to a tree or other anchor.
It is also important that you check the rope regularly to ensure that it is safely connected to the tree and not wearing down from weather or general wear and tear. Never have your ropes rubbing against or along another object or they will slowly be cut. Best to replace your ropes on a regular basis if you suspect anything to be wrong with your rope.
Connecting your rope will require some experience with knots unless you are …