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How to Choose an Art Gallery to Buy Landscape Paintings

How to Choose an Art Gallery to Buy Landscape Paintings

We think that most of art galleries should know a little about landscape paintings “history”. If you manage an art gallery that sells landscape paintings, the following information may be useful for you. This form of painting became a separate genre in 16th century and by 19th century became a popular theme for impressionists. In early periods descriptive landscapes that worked as background for mythological or religious events were more prevalent in the earlier years.

Landscape paintings found in any art gallery are used for creating balanced composition. They depict valleys, mountains, rivers, forests and have sky as background with weather important facet of the composition. In earlier years viewers as well as artists always equated these paintings to scenes of unspoiled beauty since wilderness and industrial revolution were main themes that were used in these artworks.

In Italy, there was a tendency towards vision’s breadth and idealism which caused use of landscapes in simple & broad masses of conventional tone and color for harmonizing with color schemes of pictures that used to be glowing in type. One the basis of work of Roman painters the eighteenth century concept of classical landscape paintings was born, a concept which corresponded to ‘grand style’ of figure painting.

In early years the use of landscape art form was more popular in northern Europe and more so in Flanders & in middle of fifteenth century, some painters such as Van Eyck had done such paintings that had as good a sense of lighting, space & atmosphere as any other painting that was made in the coming three hundred years. It was also in Flanders that paintings which were truly landscape were started. With time as religious enthusiasm started to lose importance some painters like Joachim Patinir & Pieter Brueghel worked to reduce scale of figures so make them insignificant to the landscape background. But this form of landscape art in its simple and pure state did not really become a popular medium for use until the seventeenth century.

If you want to buy paintings then going to an art gallery would be the most appropriate way. To choose an art gallery for purchasing landscape art you can take advice from friends and relatives who had purchased landscapes previously. You can also search the net to get opinions on the best places to purchase art work. To select an art gallery first look at the number of collections they have and the popularity of that art gallery. You also need to check the price range in which landscape paintings are available before choosing to buy paintings from a certain art gallery.…

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Custom Paintings and the History of Custom Art Or Patronage

Custom Paintings and the History of Custom Art Or Patronage

In some ways, all art is “custom art.” Most of the great masters had a patron, who would commission his artist to create a certain piece of artwork, for a specific purpose. These days, a paying customer does the same thing-he or she makes a request for something to be created, and the artist creates it.

A big difference between then and now, however, is that today, anyone can approach an artist and make a request. These days, that’s often done through a website. Suppose you’re buying a new house, or renovating your current home, and you want art to fill it. Or you’re a business owner and want elegant art to decorate your offices. You approach an artist with that request, and he or she fills it. No matter what your taste or purpose in the art you like, the artist can fulfill what you want. It’s like buying something before it’s created.

That’s exactly what the patrons of the past did. Kings and popes, for example, supported not only artists, but musicians. Patronage of the arts from the ancient world onward, even to today, was very important in the history of art. It happened most frequently in medieval and Renaissance Europe, and in places and times with a royal or imperial system dominated by an aristocracy that dominated society and controlled most of its resources.

Michelangelo, for example, was commissioned between 1508 and 1512 by Pope Julius II to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican. Michelangelo resented the commission because he felt that the work only served the Pope’s need for grandeur, but the ceiling, and especially “The Last Judgment,” is widely considered his crowning achievement in painting.

The very wealthy used patronage of the arts to endorse their political ambitions, social positions, and prestige. Much of portraiture art was commissioned by patrons, who wanted a visual representation of themselves. Portraits are often important state and family records. Every U.S. president since George Washington has had to sit for a portrait for historical records. Portraits have historically memorialized the rich and powerful, but as time has gone by, middle-class patrons, as well as corporations, groups, and clubs, have commissioned portraits of their families and colleagues.

Some patrons, such as the Medici of Florence, used patronage to “cleanse” wealth ill-gotten through usury in the 14th century. Art patronage was also important in the creation of religious art; the Roman Catholic Church, and later Protestant churches, sponsored art and architecture to decorate cathedrals and churches. Art patronage has been, up until relatively recently, been neglected in the study of art history. It’s certain that much of the art created throughout history has been due to the patronage of these individuals.

Art patronage, in its historical and traditional forms, began to end in the 19th century, with the rise of bourgeois and capitalist social forms in Europe. A more publicly-supported system of museums, mass audiences, and mass consumption has now replaced the old system of patronage. These days, the nature of the patrons has changed, from aristocrats to state governments and from churches to charitable institutions.…

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Everything You Want to Know About Setting Up a Home Theater Room

Everything You Want to Know About Setting Up a Home Theater Room

Setting up a home movie theater room starts with a plan. Start your set up by sitting down and drawing up a plan to reach your ultimate goal. A few years ago, I bought a home with a room designated for a home theater system. The room needed a movie screen, projector and media chairs. When I started this room, I thought it would be simple. But in reality, it actually required a lot of thought and attention to detail. Prior to my purchase, I never would’ve expected this to be so much work. It all starts with the size of the room. The size of the room will help determine how large of a screen will fit in the area and still be proportionate with the room. Other considerations, include determining the electronic equipment and furniture that will work with the room without making it cluttered or uncomfortable.

First, you must review the projector, audio speakers and audio video equipment desired. Every projector will have a throw distance. This is the distance between the projector and the movie screen. Your projector will have a minimum and maximum throw distance. Make sure you don’t miscalculate these measurements, as they could make your video projection too big or small depending on the model. This type of project should only be handled by professionals. If not, you’ll likely be remodeling the room after your installation is complete. Nobody wants to incur additional expenses on any project.

Now, consider how the system will be wired. The equipment has to be placed somewhere in the room, make sure its precise because the wrong choices could leave you with a lot of extra expenses. Determine how many speakers will be a part of your system. Then determine the connection between your audio/video receiver and speakers. Try and decide on a location for each of these components before your finalize any of your order.

After you’ve gotten ideas for a projector, movie screen, audio video equipment and wiring you’ll need to start reviewing the cosmetic aspects of the room. Cosmetics really set the ambience in your room from paint to carpet and curtains to light fixtures. Knowing what you want is very important before getting started. If you’re installing carpet or painting the walls make sure you choose medium to dark toned colors. In my opinion, the darker the color the better. If you’ve ever noticed a commercial movie theater with the light on, they have walls that are black and if there is color it’s typically deep red, green or blue in general. We usually find color in curtains, I decided against the traditional red curtains in exchange chose a deep charcoal gray and surrounded the back wall with padding to help with the audio acoustics.

Last, you’ll want to pick out those fancy media chairs. You can fit more people in the room with the space saver seating. These seats are like the ones you see at the traditional movie lay side by side and share the arm rest to save the most space. This gives you ability to fit maybe one, two or ten extra people in your home theater. Can’t decide, consider hiring a home theater consultant and interior designer.…

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Digital Art and the Miracles of High End Technology

Digital Art and the Miracles of High End Technology

Computers and the considerable technological benefits they offer have become an essential part of our lives. We have one computer at home and one in the office; we check our inbox first thing in the morning; we are always online on our phones, wherever we are; we send our friends photos of the cake we had for breakfast or the dress we want to purchase; and the same second a question occurs in our heads we start to surf the internet to find the answer. This is our modern world. It impacts on work – it’s almost impossible to find a job that doesn’t work with computers in some way – and even my elderly grandpa uses the internet to search for recipes for my grandma to cook him for dinner. Technology and computers have become an essential part of our lives – and naturally, artists are no exception. The result of the new technology, for artists, is to give them the ability to create artworks they would not have been able to dream of making earlier.

Digital art has increased the available variety of artworks and artistic possibilities: starting with simple digital photography, moving through images which react to the physical presence of a viewer and finally reaching virtual reality, like the CAVE. It is interesting that art came to the world of computers and not vice versa. Perhaps this is because almost all the pioneers of Digital art are primarily scientists, who dared to make science fiction real.

Benjamin Laposky, an American mathematician and artist, is widely considered the founder of Digital art. He first created a graphic image using an analog computer. In 1953 he presented his works “Oscillons” (or “Electronic Abstractions”), which were a real breakthrough in the middle of previous century. Herbert W. Franke, an Austrian scientist and science fiction writer, besides drawing images with an oscillogram, wrote the first art book about computer graphics – “Computer Graphics – Computer Art”. Emeritus professor and ex-Presidential Science Advisor A. Michael Noll was interested in aesthetic value of digital artworks; his work “Computer-Generated Ballet” was the first animation made on a digital computer.

Benjamin Laposky, Herbert W. Franke, Michael Noll and Charles Csuri, together with Manfred Mohr, Robert John Lansdown, and Frieder Nake, wiped away the borderline between science and art, widening the borders of our world.

But some people continue to say that digital art is not a real art form, and we can’t compare Leonardo’s Mona Lisa, for example, with Maurice Benayoun’s interactive installation ‘World Skin.’ Of course we cannot compare these artworks, but don’t you think that if Leonardo were alive in the 21st century he wouldn’t try at least Photoshop? And that Mozart would have a go at writing music in Abelton? What we don’t know is what impact that would have had on their masterpieces – but there’s no reason to believe it would have constrained them. On the contrary, there would have been greater options available – as there are to us today.…

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The Cultural Center and the Art Museum – A Fine Collection of Art

The Cultural Center and the Art Museum – A Fine Collection of Art

It is true that holidays are for fun but you can also get a chance to explore huge amount of knowledge about the marvelous facts and secrets hidden in this world. So if you have an interest to spend your holiday in Hong Kong then you should try to spend at least a day to get a glimpse of the history and culture of Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Cultural center and the art museum is definitely one of the decent and modern buildings. These buildings are situated in the chief and key sites of Hong Kong. The building has a contentious design with almost no windows. This place is definitely gaining the benefit of getting some inspiring views about itself.

This huge building has sand colored landmarks. This building has proved itself entirely different from others. With its roof that is of the type of waves, it has become quite popular. The culture center and the art museum are close to the Star Ferry Terminus which is in Kowloon.

While talking about the interiors, it has fabulous designs. All of them are mind blowing. There is no window so there is no possibility of the natural light coming in the interior of the building but still you will be pleased to find that the building is quite airy and spacious. This place is considered as a great venue. This center has an awesome arts library and contains the Art Museum. This building has a fine collection of antiques, scrolls, Chinese art and calligraphy. With all these fine and discrete collection this place has become the sizzling favorite of the guests and the cause of inquisitiveness for the lovers of art.

Timings To Visit The Center

Visiting hours are as follows:

Monday to Saturday from 10 in the morning to 6 in the evening and on Sundays it’s from 1 pm to 4 pm.

This place is closed on Thursday. And the timings for the holiday are same as those of Sundays.

Cost

The cost to visit this spectacular place is:

For Adults – HK$10 and HK$5 for concessions.

The cost is quite reasonable and does not snag your pocket. It means that you can have a enormous deal of pleasure and facts in this place. The holidays must have the great memories and you will surely find some of the ever lasting and unforgettable one in this Cultural center and art museum.…

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Using Amaco Rub ‘n Buff For the First Time

Using Amaco Rub ‘n Buff For the First Time

I’ll start this article by saying that I am not a person who does craft projects on a regular basis. I do the standard maintenance around the apartment, paint the occasional wall, and hang shelves when necessary, but I am not a ‘crafter’ by any stretch of the imagination. That being said, Amaco Rub ‘n Buff is one of those products that is so easy to use, that even an amateur like me wound up with a very nice finished product. I coated 17 small wooden cubes in each of the available Rub ‘n Buff colors, some of which can be seen below.

First impressions – using Rub ‘n Buff is a bit like working with a thick finger paint with a very fine grit (the metallic flakes). Make sure you shake the tube a good bit before squeezing. On first opening, several tubes had separated so that what came out was a thin liquid full of pigments and metallic flakes while the wax stayed behind, but a quick shake was all that was needed to blend the contents effectively. Be sure to use it sparingly at first – a little goes a long way. Each of the cubes (3/4″ on all sides) required only a pea-sized amount to cover fully.

I used both methods of application recommended by the manufacturers – a finger and a dry cloth. Using your finger is the more effective of the two methods and results in the least waste (quite a bit gets absorbed into the cloth), but your hands look like they have been bronzed when you are finished. Acetone gets most of the paint off, but you are still left with a lot of the metallic flakes and pigmentation stuck in the grooves of your fingers. It wears off in a day or two at most. Using a dry cloth results in a lot of wasted material and a very shiny rag. I haven’t tried running the cloth I used through the washer yet – no idea if it will come out and how it will effect everything else in the load. I would recommend application by hand, just be prepared for a mess afterward.

The directions on the package suggest letting your project dry overnight and then buffing with a clean cloth for a greater luster. It was pretty apparent that the my cubes were dry after about an hour. That could be because the wood absorbed the moisture quickly, so be prepared to wait longer with plastic and metal projects. A little light buffing did bring out the shine for the more metallic colors, but there isn’t much you can do to make ‘patina’ shiny. So unless the words ‘gold’, ‘silver’, or ‘copper’ are in the title, there isn’t much shine to be had. Not that the non-metallic colors aren’t perfectly nice. Check out the photos below to see what I mean.

All in all, I was very impressed with Rub ‘n Buff. It is very easy to apply, and the result is a very nice looking metallic or jewel-toned finish. I’d be interested to try it out on some other types of surfaces. For wood, it seems to work very well. On plastic and metal, I would expect it to take a while longer to dry.…

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VJ Art

VJ Art

VJ art is a realtime visual performance art. VJing includes creation and/ or artistic manipulation of imagery in real-time using technologies. Music synchronization is an essential attribute of this performance. All these are done for a live audience.

VJing is a common phenomenon of nightclubs, music festivals, concerts and sometimes in combination with other performances. This is obviously a live multimedia performance that incorporates music, acting and dances. Though MTV popularized the term, VJing has its roots in New York club scene of the 70s. In VJing, there is realtime mixing of content from a “library of media”, viz., from DVD disks or storage media such as VHS tapes, still and video image files on computer hard drives, live camera input, or from a computer generated visuals. It also involves realtime processing of the visual stuff.

Historically, VJing is related to the artificial practice of vision and sound. These scenes and sounds are mingleed with other live audiovisuals, such as Live Cinema, the camera obscura, the panorama and diorama, the magic lantern, color organ, and liquid light shows.

The color organ is the instrument of making colors corresponding to sound through mechanical and electrical means. The color organ was engineered by Bainbridge Bishop. The concept of the instrument is painting music. Bishop wrote in a book in 1893 about the instrument. In this machine he attached keys of an organ with different colored lights to correspond with the different notes of the instrument.

Between 1919 and 1927, Mary Hallock-Greenewalt, the piano soloist, created analogous device called Nourathar, or “essence of light” if translated to English from Arabic. Her light music constituted of environmental color fields that produced a scale of light intensities and color.

Liquid-slides, light projections and disco balls were the hot trends of in clubs and private events during the 1960s. In association with smoke the play of light used to create sensation among the audiences. These were fashionably called then liquid light shows.

Passing through several evolutionary phases over 70s and 80s it took the present form. With the evolution of digital media, its evolution, too, is a still continuing process.…

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Sony BRAVIA DAV-HDX589W 5.1-Channel Theater System

Sony BRAVIA DAV-HDX589W 5.1-Channel Theater System

Design: The Sony BRAVIA DAV-HDX589W consists of two tall left and right front speakers, a center channel, and left and right surround-satellite speakers. Created from molded plastic and permanent grills, the speakers can be either wall-mounted or set on the adjustable stands bundled with the system. While the center channel looks bulky the satellite speakers are quite small. The system uses color-coded cables for easier connection while the rear satellite speakers can receive audio signals wirelessly. An iPod dock is also offered for direct playback.

Specifications: On top of DVDs, the Sony BRAVIA DAV-HDX589W also supports audio CDs as well as MP4 music and JPEG images off a CD or DVD. Featuring a fast five-disc disc-changer the system can even play SACD formats. Connection-wise the system offers ports for composite, component and HDMI ports along with an analog RCA connection and optical as well as coaxial inputs. You can also plug in a 3.5-milimeter line-in via the front panel. The iPod dock is compatible with fourth generation iPods or higher.

Features & Performance: While the Sony BRAVIA DAV-HDX589W does offer automatic setup modes, it has issues with its audio setup, so some manual tweaking may be required to get the best configuration. However, most of the issues are bass related, so if you love bass then it shouldn’t be a problem. Thankfully, the wireless rear speakers work fine, with no real difference in audio quality despite the distance.

In terms of performance the Sony BRAVIA DAV-HDX589W offers very good bass and rather unbalanced treble in automatic calibration modes. For the most part this is suitable for movies and the like but may put off those looking for a good audio performer. Video performance for DVD and CD movies were nonetheless good with no apparent jaggies or artifacts.

All in all, the Sony BRAVIA DAV-HDX589W offers good movie and audio quality while the wireless rear speakers eliminate messy cable clutter. Audio-wise the device is probably better for the DVD movie buff or those who love a little extra power for their bass.…