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How To Adapt Your Martial Arts Training For The Streets

One of the big differences between training in the gym to fighting on the streets is your defense. A lot of martial arts train with in a fighting stance with closed fists… Like boxing. Which is great for competitive sports when you have boxing gloves on because there is a lot of padding to absorb blows which reduces the risk of injury. But if you use this type of closed fist guard then you could get knocked out even if you defend a blow. Look at mixed martial arts – they use gloves with very little padding.
The impact from MMA strikes compared with boxing gloves is much higher. It’s almost like a shoot out. You don’t get sustained trading in MMA, usually because knockouts happen fast. A street fight is the same, and are usually over within 30 seconds because someone defended better or traded better than their opponent.
So here’s how you adapt your defense for the streets.
Instead of closed fists like in boxing or Kickboxing MMA fighters don’t close their fists. They hands their open and relaxed to defend blows, this way their own fists are not going to cause damage to themselves. To use this defense you place your hands on the top/front of your head and use your forearms to block and defend incoming blows. This creates a shield and prevents you from hurting yourself when defending.
It’s very effective.
So it’s a good idea to train both open and closed fists so you’re covered for competition and the streets!…

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Analysis of Shaolin Chin Na: Instructor’s Manual for All Martial Styles by Dr Yang, Jwing-Ming

This book by Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming is a text book full of Shaolin Chin Na principles and techniques. For those not familiar with Chin Na, it is one of the four major fighting categories in Chinese martial arts. The four categories are kicking, striking, wrestling, and seize-controlling. Chin Na can be called the art of seize and control, and it consists of various joint locking techniques, as well as different grabbing, pressing, and striking.
Just like joint locks are only a portion of the Hapkido curriculum I teach, Chin Na is only a portion of Chinese arts. With that said, the concepts and techniques can be learned and incorporated into other styles, especially those that are already familiar with locking techniques such as practitioners of Hapkido, Aikido, Jujitsu, and so forth. Therefore, this book can benefit many martial artists, not just those who study Chinese arts. If your style does not include locking type techniques, Chin Na resources, including this book, can assist you in rounding out your program.
After a short Foreword and two short Prefaces (original and new one for second edition), there is a general introduction to the concepts and the basic principles. Next comes a chapter that focuses on fundamental training. A variety of exercises are illustrated and explained that will enable a practitioner to better perform the techniques taught in the manual.
The next few chapters are divided by the type of Chin Na explained in them. They consist of Finger; Wrist; Elbow; Shoulder, Neck and Waist, Leg; Muscle Grabbing; Cavity Press; and then a short chapter on using Chin Na in a fight, and another on the treatment of injuries. The book then concludes with a two-paragraph conclusion and several appendixes.
There are numerous techniques in this book (The back cover says over 150), and each one has a description of how to do the technique, with accompanying photographs, the principle behind the technique pointed out, and a description with photos of an escape and counter to the technique. I especially liked that these escapes and counters were included. I felt these added much value to the collection of information, especially as an instructor resource. The pictures are black and white, and sometimes a little difficult to fully discern what is being done. If you are apt at joint locking techniques, you can most likely figure it out. However, if you are a novice, you might have a little trouble with some of them. To remedy this, you could pick up Dr. Yang’s DVDs to see the techniques performed. In fact, I’d encourage anyone to complete their Chin Na resource library by including both the books and DVDs Dr. Yang has put out. Using them together make for a much better learning experience.
The chapter on using Chin Na in a fight is pretty short. There are two pages of good concepts, and then a small sampling of concepts and techniques illustrated with photographs. Dr. Yang admits this is just a tiny sample, but points out that he included more in his book “Comprehensive Applications of Shaolin Chin Na.” I have not read that book yet, but it is on my list. Like the applications chapter, the treatment of injuries chapter is also short. You won’t be a competent healer from this chapter, but it gives some general information and hopefully peaks your interest to further your study in the healing arts as well as the fighting arts. They go hand in hand.
Overall, this is an exceptional manual to help a person learn Chin Na, and I recommend it highly, as I do all of Dr. Yang’s cannon of Chin Na resources.…

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Gangs Learn Martial Arts By Joining The Military!

This is an awful notion, that a gang member could learn martial arts by joining the army. The sad truth, however, is that gang recruitment is up, severely, and these gangs are actually using the military for training in martial arts, combat weapons, and all manner of skills. This could be utterly terrifying, if you think about it, a gang member being trained as a soldier and then turned loose on the streets of America.
That the number of these criminals enlisting in the military is up is without a doubt. According to the FBI there has been a sizable 40 per cent rise in gang membership since 2009. These are people reared in the gang society, don’t have work, and the military presents a viable option for earning a living.
To be honest, many gang members join the military hoping to get out of the gang lifestyle. Once in, however, they find a subculture of gang members embedded in the armed services. These embedded gangsters go about recruiting new gang members, and picking up any ‘strays’ that are attempting to leave the fold.
The FBI further says that they have evidence that over fifty different gangs, representing all the major gangs, have presence in the armed forces. These gangsters come from 100 different areas of the country. This is a rather large segment of the population.
The report details that only are gang members joining the military, but other equally undesirable elements are finding a home there. Also enlisting in the military are members of Outlaw Motorcycle gangs. There have even been reports of members of prison gangs joining up.
That this criminal element is becoming a serious threat to homeland harmony is obvious. These budding felon types can get military hardware, such as machine guns, and even explosive devices. All too often these criminal types join the army reserve, then go home on leave and share the training.
One rather sobering potential behind this rise in gang enlistment is the ability to use military resources to actually enhance criminal activity. Apparently gang members have been able to access military computers to ‘scope out’ potential areas to expand their activities. Gang members have been able to use the military database and communication systems to actually deal in drugs.
To summarize, it is hard to know what to do about this situation. The military needs intelligent men, and a clever gang member fits the need. At any rate, that bad people could learn martial arts, and actually use other facets of military training is something the federal government may have to meet.…

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How To Deal With Bullies – 4 Ways That Martial Arts Training Can Help Your Child

Most people equate martial arts training with fighting. And, with the number of sport-oriented styles out there, it’s easy to see how this would be so. But, even for those who see martial arts as self-defense training, the misconception still centers around self-defense being the same as fighting. And for some parents who are looking for ways to teach their children how to deal with bullies, the idea of fighting, or turning their child into an aggressive human being, doesn’t sound too appealing.
But, there are many ways that a good, solid martial arts training program – especially one that focuses on teaching life skills – can help your child to deal with bullies. This article focuses on the following four benefits of martial arts training:
1) Improved posture – By developing his or body, as-well-as learning a greater sense of respect and discipline, your child will learn to stand up straight. This eliminates certain physical signs of weakness and low self-esteem such as rounded or slouched shoulders, and will make your child appear to be taller and stronger.
2) Eye-Contact – As your child progresses through their martial arts moves, skills, and techniques, you will see a marked change in confidence. Remember that success breeds success. And, with each passing belt test and promotion to a higher rank, your child’s confidence will grow higher as-well.
3) Confident Speech – Children who are timid, unsure, or who feel weaker than others, often show this through softer and even mumbled speech. A good martial arts instructor – one focused on actually developing his or her students on a personal level – will insure that their students speak up and communicate more clearly.
4) Self-Defense – The truth is that, no matter how much we would like our children to never have to fight, a bully IS attacking your child! And, while some will use words, gestures, and other non-physical methods to attack your child, the reality is that a good number of bullies do use physical action. Even those who are more verbal, may be prone to physical violence when the target of their assault doesn’t respond the way they would like.
The fact is that, like it or not, your child may have to deal with bullies who will come at him or her with fists, feet, or even weapons. To not properly prepare your child to be able to defend against a violent physical attack is the same as putting him in a car without the necessary lessons…
hoping that everything goes okay!…

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Brazilian Jiujitsu – The Thinking Man’s Martial Art

This is a very important question I want you to ask yourself.
When you’re training and sparring, what’s going on in the back of your mind?
I mean, more than just what you’re thinking, how are you thinking about it?
Are you telling yourself that you’re just trying to survive?
Are you telling yourself to force through your techniques because you’re not sure about them?
These two examples will tell you a lot about flaws in your approach.
Whatever it is you’re thinking, it’s a great idea to be aware of it and write it down after your training.
This is one of the fastest ways that you can get out of whatever problems you have in your training.
For example, let’s say you keep getting caught in a certain submission and can’t figure out what you’re doing wrong or what to do to counter or escape.
I can guarantee you that if you’re telling yourself, “I always get stuck here.” or “what am I doing wrong?” then you will keep doing that same thing and repeating the same pattern and getting the same results.
By becoming aware of this and writing it down you can start to get out of that habit and answer the question.
If you always get caught in a certain submission and say I always get stuck here, then obviously the next step is to find out why and what you should be doing to prevent or counter it.
If you find yourself repeatedly asking what you are doing wrong, then you are uncertain about something that you are doing before getting caught and need to figure out what that is.
Asking your instructor or training partner for help here in finding the solution is very useful.
You’ll also want to change what you are saying to yourself.
Again with the two above examples, if you’re “always getting stuck” or asking “what are you doing wrong?” Then you need to replace those with “I’ll never get stuck here again” or “what am I going to do instead?”
By finding out what you are doing wrong and replacing that with what you should be doing and replacing what you’re saying to yourself in those moments, you’ll be changing your thinking and actions and getting new results instead.
This should make it clear enough that there is a reason why Jiujitsu is called the thinking man’s martial art.…

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Common Martial Arts Equipment

No matter what style of martial arts you’re participating in, you’ll need some type of gear to enhance and complement your ability to train effectively and efficiently. Keep in mind that the more the martial arts gear costs does not mean it is automatically the best piece of equipment for you.
Safety concerns should be at the top of the list when deciding on suitable martial arts gear, so as to protect yourself and your partner from injury. Do a little bit of research and don’t base your decision solely on equipment costs.
There are many different martial arts disciplines that require a whole array of equipment. Let us focus on the main pieces that are needed to participate in most styles. In the end, it is a matter of getting the correct equipment that is required for the kind of training and drilling you are going to be doing.
Gear Basics:
Mouth Piece
The mouthpiece will protect your teeth from a direct hit and prevent a tooth from cutting the inside of your lip. Stick with a mouth piece that will fit snug to both the top and bottom rows of teeth. The mold should be tight enough to make it a little difficult to take off.
Protective Cup
A needed item for men that should be chosen for the specific sport they are playing. Martial artist want to get a tucked-under contoured cup to offer the best protection from stray punches and kicks.
Uniform
The Kimono (GI) is the common uniform worn by most styles with a belt to signify the rank of the student. Other uniform alternatives are plain shorts and an academy rash guard or T-shirt. Most styles require no footwear or the use of shoes that are made to be worn on a soft mat surface. All uniforms should be kept clean and free of rips and tears.
Gloves
Gloves come in average sizes and can range from 4 oz (MMA) up to 20 oz (Boxing). You want to have a glove that fits tight and doesn’t allow your hand to move around. Pick the appropriate glove for the style of training and invest in hand wraps to aid in the prevention of injury to the wrists.
Shin Guards
Leg padding focuses on the shin area where most of the contact is made with a kick. Pads have different thicknesses and some will cover the top of the foot as well as the front of the leg. Shin pads use straps or a sleeve to hold the padding in place.
This list covers the principal pieces of martial arts gear required in the students daily training. All protective gear helps to make training effective and safe.
The gear you’ll need can be purchase at the academy your training at, in any chain sporting goods stores, or online through a reputable site. Choose martial arts gear that is appropriate for the style of training and gives the best level of protection. Make training fun with the right choice in gear.…

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A Martial Arts School

Joining a martial art school is a daunting task. It is similar to buying a car, lots of thinking involved to get the best in the end. In this increasing commercial marketplace, you need to compare the worth of every school offering different kinds of martial arts training. You need to check their authenticity and certification to rely on their actual worth. Also, they need to tell the right techniques to learn the right ways to practice your chosen skills to gain expertise in the same. You can purchase matching accessories and other equipments to meet all your needs.
How to make the right choice in finding the right place to practice your skills? This is not an easy question; you need to think thoroughly about this to get the desired results. By shopping around and gathering right information about the martial arts facilities, you can get the choice for your interest. Like any other commercial product, there are a number of criteria that make credible arts studios more attractive and legitimate than their counterparts.
Unfortunately, beginners face a lot of difficulty while making the right decision. Always remember key factors to identify the right provider that can tremendously change the future of your personal goals. Try to know about the attitude of your chosen school. It can be easily dug out by asking questions every small detail about their functioning, way of exercising and such others. Ask questions and get the most needed answers to firm your decision of joining a martial art facility.…

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Types Of Martial Arts You Could Learn And Practice

We all have probably watched movies about martial arts. In fact, we oftentimes mimic the movement we have seen performed by the actors. These martial arts movies may even have sparked or interest to learn and master it. Just as what we have learned from the movies, there are various types of martial arts that an enthusiast could choose to learn. It is interesting to know that these fighting styles actually came from different nations and cultures. Below are some of them.
Aikido
This martial art hailed from Japan and was known to be developed by the Great Teacher, Morihei Ueshiba. This art involves joint locks and throws derived from Jujitsu and other techniques from Kenjutsu. With Aikido, you will learn not merely to punch or to kick your opponent; but to actually use his energy to throw them away and control the fight. This martial art is not static; it emphasizes on dynamic motion instead.
Bando
Bando or Bando Thaing is an armed/unarmed native combat style from Burma. It also adapts different strikes, throws and techniques from other martial arts like Karate and Judo. It also incorporates the use of fighting tools like sticks, spears and knives. The emphasis of this style is to initially withdraw and then attack from a point beyond the opponent’s reach. All body parts are used in attacking the opponent. After delivering the initial movement, other techniques like locking and grappling will follow.
Capoeira
This can be considered as a sport, art form and also a self-defense technique. It originated from Brazil and implements some aerobic/dance components. With this art, you will learn how to use both your body and your soul; you will learn how to fight while dancing; you will train mentally, physically as well as emotionally. This is not merely about singing or dancing, but about the energy you put into every move you try. It also involves harmonious relation between forces that will provide you with flexibility, power, endurance and also self-discovery. Nowadays, this art has been growing popularity as an aerobic alternative.
Jeet Kune Do
This art form is the complete embodiment of the philosophical and technical knowledge studied and passed on by the well-known Bruce Lee while he was still alive. This is to be considered as the root from which Bruce Lee himself was established. It was from this martial art that he personally evolved and discovered deeply about himself.
Jujitsu
This is the art of flexibility and suppleness, but learning this art is actually far from being supple. The principle in this art is not to use strength for strength. Rather, it employs using the strength of your opponent, as well as his attack force, as actual tools to use against him. It incorporates the use of joint locks, throws, chokes and unarmed strikes that can subdue even an opponent that is larger than you.
Krav Maga
This fighting system will show about preventing, dealing and overcoming all sorts of attacks and violence. This system was developed in Israel. It is performed naturally as well as intuitively. Students of Krav Maga are taught of combat and defense skills to protect not just one’s self, but also others.…

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5 Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Padwork in a Martial Arts Workout

All martial arts that include striking use pads to help develop a practitioner’s punches and strikes. If they don’t they should start using them! Whether you train with the boxing style mitts or the larger Muay Thai pads these five tips will help you get the most from your equipment.
Big Fat Head – often the pads are held too wide apart. The key is to be able to strike the pads as if you’re striking an opponent’s head, to enable this, the pads need to be held close to the padman’s face. To avoid the padman getting hit in the face, punches should always be thrown diagonally. That is the right hand strikes across to the left, which is the holder’s right pad and vice versa. A badly directed strike will then slip off the pad to the outside.
Human’s can move – often the padman stays rooted to the spot and in effect becomes the equivalent of a static hanging bag. A good idea is to mimic the movement of a real opponent. It is essential to include lateral and backward/forward movement.
Human’s can return fire – again mimicking a real opponent punches and kicks can be executed by the padman. These can be performed either before or after a combination from the striker. For advanced students these can also come before a combination is completed, to test the defences, for example.
Distance training – once more mimicking a real opponent the padman can move in and out of range forcing the striker to move accordingly. If the striker is in range but inactive the padman can throw a shot at the striker, to test his defence and to remind him of the range.
Timing training – the padman can throw a series of punches which can be used to develop good timing. The striker has to throw his shots between the strikes. This takes skill on the part of the padman as he must return the pad to a position that is hittable!
Through experimentation these tips can be employed to develop drills to greatly enhance the skills of a martial artist regardless of style. By keeping these tips in mind when making the padman as much like a real opponent as possible, while retaining the role of pad holder, greatly expands the possibilities for using these essential pieces of equipment. The martial artist can then train as closely as possible to real, very safely.
While these drills take a bit of training to get the hang of, the padman plays a very important role, they will improve your ability to strike hard and effectively, guaranteed! They also offer an effective workout. Pads really are essential kit!…

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The Truth About Ninjutsu – The Ninja Were Mixed Martial Arts Masters Long Before MMA Was Cool!

Have you ever wondered why mixed martial arts became so popular? Could it be because at least part of the martial arts world saw the gaps that existed within each of the popular systems and sought to remedy the situation? I think so. After all, why limit yourself to just punching and kicking, or just grappling, etc., when you can have a greater advantage with both in your arsenal?
The problem with this new approach, other than the fact that MMA tends to be sport-oriented and is laden with rules that run contrary to street self defense tactics, is that non-complimenting systems were brought together and forced to co-exist.
What I mean by this is that…
Wrestling and ground-fighting tends be strength-based and relies on muscle contraction.
Judo and aikido lean toward a more passive, relaxed adapting to the opponent’s advances, and…
Karate and tae kwon do are very aggressive, attack-oriented arts.
This creates a situation where the practitioner is required to constantly switch between the contradictory and often conflicting concepts and principles that each “style” is base upon.
But, we ninja like to say that, “we were mixed martial artists long before MMA was cool!”
And, the reason for this is that there is no contradiction between our principles of punching & kicking, grappling, joint locking techniques, or the way we use weapons. There is no contradiction because, unlike the systems created by mixing other styles together, everything in Ninjutsu is based on the same principles and concepts.
So, the ninja never has to try to make his body conform to, and reconcile the different demands of, combining techniques that require often opposite principles of application. And, this is just accounting for the unarmed part of the Ninja’s arsenal. When we add in all the weaponry (modern and classical), stealth tactics, wilderness survival, and other aspects of the art, it’s easy to see how…
Not only was the art of ninjutsu MMA before mixed martial arts were cool, but… Ninjutsu offers much, much more than mixed martial artists can conceive of!…