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Types Of Martial Arts You Could Learn And Practice

We all have probably watched movies about martial arts. In fact, we oftentimes mimic the movement we have seen performed by the actors. These martial arts movies may even have sparked or interest to learn and master it. Just as what we have learned from the movies, there are various types of martial arts that an enthusiast could choose to learn. It is interesting to know that these fighting styles actually came from different nations and cultures. Below are some of them.
Aikido
This martial art hailed from Japan and was known to be developed by the Great Teacher, Morihei Ueshiba. This art involves joint locks and throws derived from Jujitsu and other techniques from Kenjutsu. With Aikido, you will learn not merely to punch or to kick your opponent; but to actually use his energy to throw them away and control the fight. This martial art is not static; it emphasizes on dynamic motion instead.
Bando
Bando or Bando Thaing is an armed/unarmed native combat style from Burma. It also adapts different strikes, throws and techniques from other martial arts like Karate and Judo. It also incorporates the use of fighting tools like sticks, spears and knives. The emphasis of this style is to initially withdraw and then attack from a point beyond the opponent’s reach. All body parts are used in attacking the opponent. After delivering the initial movement, other techniques like locking and grappling will follow.
Capoeira
This can be considered as a sport, art form and also a self-defense technique. It originated from Brazil and implements some aerobic/dance components. With this art, you will learn how to use both your body and your soul; you will learn how to fight while dancing; you will train mentally, physically as well as emotionally. This is not merely about singing or dancing, but about the energy you put into every move you try. It also involves harmonious relation between forces that will provide you with flexibility, power, endurance and also self-discovery. Nowadays, this art has been growing popularity as an aerobic alternative.
Jeet Kune Do
This art form is the complete embodiment of the philosophical and technical knowledge studied and passed on by the well-known Bruce Lee while he was still alive. This is to be considered as the root from which Bruce Lee himself was established. It was from this martial art that he personally evolved and discovered deeply about himself.
Jujitsu
This is the art of flexibility and suppleness, but learning this art is actually far from being supple. The principle in this art is not to use strength for strength. Rather, it employs using the strength of your opponent, as well as his attack force, as actual tools to use against him. It incorporates the use of joint locks, throws, chokes and unarmed strikes that can subdue even an opponent that is larger than you.
Krav Maga
This fighting system will show about preventing, dealing and overcoming all sorts of attacks and violence. This system was developed in Israel. It is performed naturally as well as intuitively. Students of Krav Maga are taught of combat and defense skills to protect not just one’s self, but also others.It appears that your web host has disabled all functions for handling remote pages and as a result the BackLinks software will not function on your web page. Please contact your web host for more information.…

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Scapes and Forms: Zaria Art School, Sustaining the Rudiments in Contemporary Art Practice

In this year 2011, January 22 would probably remain a unique day, not for any other reason but for the fact that, it ushers an event that has historical connotation to Nigerian artists based in Zaria. On that Saturday morning around 10:00 am, amidst the harmattan weather with its penetrating cold wind which has little or no respect for people wearing light denims, a teeming number of artists were brought together to partake in an art workshop titled: Scapes and Forms. The workshop pulled artists from their studios into an open environment where creative talents/endeavors were artistically harnessed in a delightful manner to produce different forms of visual representations. The occasion was more or less like a midpoint for both lecturers and students especially of the twin-departments (Fine Arts and Industrial Design) in ABU Zaria, to refresh their artistic skills but largely in various two-dimensional forms: painting and drawing. Over sixty artists, who responded to workshop with enthusiasm, gathered in front of Samaru market, Zaria, to artistically take the Scapes and Forms of the activities going on in the area.
Shortly before the commencement of the workshop, Dr. G.G. Duniya, who happened to be the lead facilitator of the workshop (assisted by Mr. Lasisi Lamidi), addressed participants before declaring it open. In his address, Dr. Duniya highlighted the essence as well as the purpose of the workshop, and what it (the workshop) intends to achieve: “This painting and drawing workshop is intended to serve as an avenue for creative minds to interact and share drawing and painterly ideas, away from the normal studio setting. The workshop is also expected to expose professionals and student artists to the numerous possibilities in art, using varied media and techniques or experiments”. He concluded by saying “we advice you to feel free and express yourselves in the Zaria Art School’s freedom of expression, using forms before you and the materials that suits your creative impulse”.
Immediately after the address, easels were mounted by some artists while other artists took strategic sitting positions that best suit their views. But more interestingly, cars brought by some participants to the venue were automatically turned into stabilizing platforms for keeping drawing boards while the workshop goes on. On the other hand, a good number of participants were seen squatting on the ground with their drawing boards, taking artistic view of their creative taste. The venue was an utmost contradiction to studio environment as it offers seeming challenges but mostly to the advantage of the participants. For example, the traffic of people in the market at the other side of the road, the moving vehicles and cyclists as well as sounds/noises generated by the traffics, contributed in shaping the aura of the workshop’s venue into a disorganized and noisy environment. This is unlike studio situation which is usually calm and serene; however, the venue was probably the best for that kind of workshop since the participants of the workshop later converted the inherent challenges therein, into creative opportunities by displaying their artistic talents in various two-dimensional forms.
In terms of attendance, the participants of the Scapes and Forms’s workshop, cut across undergraduate and postgraduate students of both Fine Arts and Industrial Design departments, as well as lecturers in the Department of Fine Arts, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. The uniqueness of the workshop was not only because it was held in an out-door environment that stimulates high creative impulse for exciting artistic designs, it also lies in the fact that some students, probably for the first time, find themselves drawing or painting along side with their lecturers (professionals). This scenario was highly favoured by mutual interactivity between the two (lecturers and students) with jokes and funny comments to keep the venue lively while the workshop progresses.
Another factor which contributed to adding more flavour in the workshop was the open thematization “Scapes and Forms” which paved way for diverse artistic creations. In view of that, it was common to see interplay of different media in different styles in the works the participating artists. Hence, one artist is painting while another artist sitting next is drawing in charcoal. But most importantly, the open theme favoured creative diversity on the part of the participating artists especially on the choice of art expression which was generally seen in their works. For example, Dr. Ken Okoli opt to take the photographic aspect of the event, while Mr. Wesley (a lecturer in sculpture) decides to reveal the other side of his artistic flair in painting.
Call it a Zaria affair; but for those who were present can agree with the writer that it goes beyond that point as the presence of artists from other art schools attended. For example, the presence of Mr. Tony Emodi and Mr. Emmanuel Eroka both from Yaba College of Technology, …